Wednesday, July 26, 2006

Seattle Publisher Rebuts False Coverage of American Values Awards for Movies

Seattle Publisher Rebuts False Coverage of American Values Awards for Movies

Reports about the American Values Awards for Movies and Television (TM) by global news agencies and the entertainment news media contain factual errors, according to the founder of the Awards, Michael Class. Awards Are Extension of Inspiring American History Photo-Book that Teaches Values.

Issaquah, WA (PRWEB) February 9, 2006

Reports about the American Values Awards for Movies and Television (TM) by global news agencies and the entertainment news media contain factual errors, according to the founder of the Awards, Michael Class.

The common error is the designation of Class as “filmmaker." Class is founder of Magic Picture Frame Studio, a new Seattle-area book publisher dedicated to transforming the way children learn American history and the lessons from it. His company’s first release is the museum-quality book, Anthony and the Magic Picture Frame, in which a modern boy time-travels into great events of the 20th century. Amazing digital photos depict Anthony, Class’ son, in the cockpit of the Spirit of St. Louis with Charles Lindbergh, on the moon with Neil Armstrong, and on Normandy beach on D-Day. It's all historically accurate: Anthony's conversations with American heroes are based on things they really said. Photos from the book are available at: www. MagicPictureFrame. com

Class uses movies as a teaching tool. His book includes a list of recommended books, movies, music, and places to visit. The American Values Awards are an extension of the nearly 600 movies listed in his book: “Movies every American should see,” according to Class.

Other errors appearing in some news reports are:

(1) Statements that Class launched “moral values” prizes. He launched prizes for “American values” and defined the term on his Web site (www. MagicPictureFrame. com). Says Class: “I am celebrating films that portray values Americans hold dear -- values that helped make this country great -- and for helping to pass those values to America’s children."

Continues Class: "I did call two films, Syriana and Munich, ‘morally confused,’ but that’s different: Syriana blames America for terrorism, which is just plain wrong; Munich confuses justice with vengeance, and morally equates counter-terrorism with terrorism."

(2) Statements that Class is “unhappy” at the awards success of films such as gay romance Brokeback Mountain. Class emphasizes: “My reason for not recommending Brokeback Mountain is clear: the main character chooses to engage in an adulterous affair that destroys his marriage. It’s a tragic tale, but can't make my list because there is no positive behavior to emulate.”

“My choices for the best films of 2005 are those that educate, and inspire,” Class says. “I think most Americans agree with me. The combined gross revenue of all five ‘Best Picture’ Oscar nominees falls short of even a single film on my list, Chronicles of Narnia, which was not nominated.”

The American Values Award winners for 2005 are: End of the Spear, Cinderella Man, The Chronicles of Narnia, Star Wars: Episode III, Harry Potter GOF, The Great Raid, and Millions. For details about the Awards and the Award winners, visit the Web site: www. magicpictureframe. com

Class has already placed two films on his list for 2006: Glory Road, the inspiring true story of how a small school in West Texas with an unproven coach and an all-black starting team of basketball players changed history; and Flight 93, the true story of the ordinary Americans who fought back against evil on 9/11 and became heroes to remember in the War on Terror.

Says Class: "Glory Road is a story of overcoming prejudice and doing something that is bigger than yourself. In the theater where I watched the film, people stood up and cheered when the movie was over. I did, too. And, Flight 93 is a 'must see' film for every American. It should be shown in every high school in the country."

Class invites people to nominate movies for the American Values Award for 2006 at his Web site.

Anthony and the Magic Picture Frame (hardcover, 225 pages, $35) is available at www. MagicPictureFrame. com, or by calling toll-free: 1-800-247-6553. The book is also available at select bookstores and on amazon. com.

Contact: Michael S. Class (author), 425-222-7562, Magic Picture Frame Studio, P. O. Box 2603, Issaquah, WA 98027-0119. Or contact: Maryann Karinch (publicist), 970-577-8500.

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