Tuesday, November 22, 2005

Science Podcasters Produce PSA to Save Lives

Science Podcasters Produce PSA to Save Lives

Podcasters are joining in the fight to stop a silent killer stalking computer programmers, international travelers, and anyone who spends long periods of time sitting still. A public service announcement about the dangers of DVT (deep veinous thrombosis) is airing on hundreds of thousands of computers thanks to the efforts of two medical science podcasters.

Rising Sun, MD (PRWEB) July 2, 2008

Podcasters are joining in the fight to stop a silent killer stalking computer programmers, international travelers, and anyone who spends long periods of time sitting still. A public service announcement about the dangers of DVT (deep vein thrombosis) is airing on hundreds of thousands of computers thanks to the efforts of the TWiT Podcast Network and the collaboration of two medical and science podcasters, Jamie Davis of the MedicCast Network and Marc Pelletier of Futures in Biotech. (http://www. mediccast. com/blog/2008/06/30/dvt-psa/ (http://www. mediccast. com/blog/2008/06/30/dvt-psa/))

DVT is a blood clot that usually forms in the leg veins after someone has been immobile for a period of time. Sometimes this clot can break loose and travel to the lungs forming a pulmonary embolism. According to the Centers for Disease Control (http://www. cdc. gov/Features/Thrombosis/ (http://www. cdc. gov/Features/Thrombosis/)), between 200,000 and 400,000 people develop DVT each year in the U. S. and more than half of those people develop pulmonary embolism which kills one third of the people it affects. The good news is that for many people, DVT is completely preventable by getting moving every hour or two.

The following people are at increased risk for forming one of these life threatening blood clots: People with injuries to their veins, often caused by fractures, leg injury, or recent surgery. People with slow blood flow, often caused by confinement to bed, being seated for long periods (especially with crossed legs). Women with increased estrogen levels, often caused by birth control pills, hormone replacement, or recent pregnancy. Frequent travelers and office workers are also at increased risk because of the long periods of time spent seated.

Prevention tips from the CDC and mentioned in the PSA include moving around as soon as possible after being confined to bed, such as after surgery, illness, or injury. When sitting for long periods of time, such as when traveling for more than four hours, get up and walk around every 2 to 3 hours and exercise your legs while you're sitting by raising and lowering your heels while keeping your toes on the floor, raising and lowering your toes while keeping your heels on the floor, and tightening and releasing your leg muscles. You can also help yourself by wearing loose fitting clothes, drinking plenty of water and avoiding alcohol and caffeine.

Podcasters and media organizations interested in downloading and using this public service announcement may download it and access the CDC links here. Permission is given to use the recording in its full, unedited form. Other uses may be allowed by contacting the authors, Jamie Davis or Marc Pelletier. Listen to and download the file at the following link. (http://www. mediccast. com/blog/2008/06/30/dvt-psa/ (http://www. mediccast. com/blog/2008/06/30/dvt-psa/))

Marc Pelletier, PhD, is the host of Futures in Biotech (http://twit. tv/FIB (http://twit. tv/FIB)), a podcast featuring interviews with leaders in the biotechnology industry. Explore the world of genetics, cloning, protein folding, genome mapping, and more with the most important researchers in biotech.

Jamie Davis, NREMT-P, BA, ADN is the host of two of the most popular medical podcasts, the MedicCast, for emergency services providers, and the Nursing Show, for nurses by nurses. Both can be found at the MedicCast Network site (http://mediccast. com (http://mediccast. com)).

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