Sunday, September 12, 2004

E-PuntaCana. com Releases a Visitor's Guide to the Punta Cana Airport

E-PuntaCana. com Releases a Visitor's Guide to the Punta Cana Airport

According to e-PuntaCana. com, Punta Cana’s airport is not only a welcoming structure to visitors arriving on the island, but also an environmentally-friendly building that gives back to the island’s environment.

(PRWEB) November 19, 2005

According to e-PuntaCana. com, Punta Cana’s airport is not only a welcoming structure to visitors arriving on the island, but also an environmentally-friendly building that gives back to the island’s environment.

As the flight reaches the Dominican Republic, one cannot miss the thatched roof and the open air design of the Punta Cana International Airport. The airport was designed to both welcome visitors, and be environmentally responsible, using native design and materials.

There is a modern new air-conditioned terminal for passenger arrivals.

Upon arriving at the Punta Cana airport, each passenger is required to purchase a $10.00 tourist card before entering customs. After retrieving luggage and clearing customs, passengers are usually greeted by their tour company representative and directed to board the correct bus for transfer to their resort. The Department of Migration photographs United States citizens who enter the Dominican Republic with birth certificates and photo identification. This will not affect United States citizens who travel using their passports. This is being done to prevent illegal entry back into the United States. The computerized systems are in place at each of the international air and maritime ports. However, visitors in general are advised to confirm travel documentation with the nearest Dominican Republic Consulate.

As e-PuntaCana. com explains, there are direct flights to Punta Cana from a number of major cities throughout the world, including New York, Miami, Philadelphia, Paris, and Buenos Aries.

There are direct flights from the following airports in the United States:

-Atlanta Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport

-Charlotte

-Cincinnati Northern Kentucky International Airport

-Manchester

-Miami International Airport

-New York John F. Kennedy International Airport

-Newark Liberty International Airport

-Orlando Sanford International Airport

-Philadelphia International Airport

-St. Louis Lambert International Airport

US Airways operates non-stop round-trip flights from Philadelphia every Saturday, Sunday and Tuesday. The flight duration is around five hours. Other airlines like Continental also operate flights to Punta Cana. Flights from New York take around 3 hours and 15 min while flights from Miami take less than 2 hours. There are daily flights from Punta Cana to several domestic and regional Caribbean airports. Most hotels are within 30 minutes of the airport. Airlines can be contacted at their toll free numbers for updated flight times. While at Punta Cana, visitors can find more information regarding their travel from the Ministry of Tourism.

About e-puntacana. com

Punta Cana provides detailed information about Punta Cana resorts, hotels, real estate, beaches, weather, and the Punta Cana airport. For more information go to http://www. e-puntacana. com (http://www. e-puntacana. com) and/or visit its sister site at http://www. cozumel-web. com (http://www. cozumel-web. com) for related information.

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Life On Umbriel – Hollywood Blockbuster Waiting To Happen

Life On Umbriel – Hollywood Blockbuster Waiting To Happen

It’s not a question of if this magnificent novel becomes a feature film. It’s a question of when.

(PRWEB) February 23, 2006

Paul J. Barker’s “Life On Umbriel,” although only recently published, is already making a name for itself among discriminating readers of fiction. The reason for its success is obvious: It’s about the coziest little “nightstand novel” one could ask for. The story, reminiscent of the rugged wilderness in which it’s set, is exciting, savage, and beautiful.

“Life On Umbriel” resurrects the legend of one Jarrod Morgan, a nineteenth century native of British Columbia known for his freakish agility and strength. Wrongfully convicted of murdering his traveling companion, Morgan is imprisoned and sentenced to hang. He puts his physical gifts to good use on the morning of his execution, as witnesses to his jailbreak later attest. Thinking the rugged coastal wilderness might temporarily conceal him, he heads west, eluding several North West Mounted Police officers along the way.

Boxed into a corner by a tenacious bounty hunter, Jarrod finds he has nowhere to go but up. He scales an impossibly steep mountain that has seemingly materialized out of nowhere; upon witnessing this acrobatic display – this “warping of natural laws” – the dumbstruck bounty hunter does not even think to get a shot off.

And then things really start to get interesting. Why is this mountain so oddly shaped? Just how tall is the blasted thing? Why is there a mist encircling it at 7,000 feet? Can even the superhuman Jarrod hope to conquer it?

Since the answers to these questions constitute more information than “Life On Umbriel’s” publicity department is willing to dispense, why not seek the answers within the book itself? “Life On Umbriel” (ISBN# 0-595-37832-3) should be available all over the Internet by now – and if it isn’t stocked at your favorite brick-and-mortar bookstore you can probably order it there. For the best deals try the author’s website: http://www. dontlikemyjob. com (http://www. dontlikemyjob. com)

Paul J. Barker is best known for “Timothy’s Take-Out,” a novel that has attained something resembling cult status amongst people who don’t like their jobs. It is a masterpiece of humorous fiction and can be found, appropriately enough, at http://www. dontlikemyjob. com/pages/1/index. htm (http://www. dontlikemyjob. com/pages/1/index. htm).

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